Rolls-Royce Science Prize celebrates outstanding science teaching

Tuesday, 12 October 2010

Rolls-Royce, the global power systems company, has announced the winner of this year’s Science Prize, an annual initiative to celebrate and reward excellence in science teaching.

As a global employer of scientists and engineers, Rolls-Royce recognises that the future skills requirements of the engineering sector are dependent on the quality of science teaching delivered in schools and colleges. Now in its seventh year, the prize highlights the very best in science teaching by showcasing inspirational science-based projects from schools and colleges across the country.

Teesdale Secondary School, from County Durham, beat off competition from more than 1,500 schools to win the prize for their year-long project to research and develop feeding mechanisms for monkeys at Chester Zoo. The feeders require the monkeys to work out how the food is dispensed, helping to keep them active and healthy.

At a ceremony held in London’s Science Museum last night, Teesdale was awarded £15,000 to further advance science teaching for its students, as well as the chance to spend a day with the Red Arrows display team.

Presenting the award, Rolls-Royce Chief Executive, Sir John Rose, said: “I would like to congratulate all the finalists for their tremendous effort and commitment to teaching science. Teesdale Secondary School’s success shows how science can be used creatively to solve real challenges. It is essential that we inspire young people to think seriously about science and the opportunities it can bring not only in the classroom but beyond into their future careers.”

On being announced the winner, Teesdale Secondary School’s Rob Aspden, said: “Enthusing young people to engage in and enjoy the fascinating world of science and technology was at the heart of this project. It’s a great honour to accept this award on behalf of everyone at the school, whose hard work and dedication to science made the project possible.”

Each year, the company awards a total of £120,000 in cash prizes to schools. Fifty schools that submitted entries of a high standard, but did not reach the finals, each won £1,000.

The Rolls-Royce Science Prize is open to all schools and colleges in the UK attending courses at one of the Science Learning Centres. The national network of Science Learning Centres delivers inspirational and innovative subject-specific continuing professional development to teachers, lecturers, technicians and teaching assistants throughout the United Kingdom.

  1. The Rolls-Royce Science Prize is open to all schools and colleges in the UK attending courses at one of the Science Learning Centres. Awards are presented to teams of adults, led by practising teachers, who can create inspiring and sustainable teaching proposals that address a specific need in their school or college.  
    More details are available at www.Rolls-Royce.com/scienceprize
  2. The winning school receives a £15,000 prize and the runner-up wins £10,000. The other seven finalist schools are awarded £6,000 each to implement their projects during the academic year. Fifty schools that submit entries of a very high standard, but do not reach the finals, will win £1,000 each.
  3. The nine finalists, competing for last night’s award, were selected from a field of 1,500 schools and colleges.
  4. Rolls-Royce, a world-leading provider of power systems and services for use on land, at sea and in the air, has established a strong position in global markets - civil aerospace, defence aerospace, marine and energy.
  5. The Group has a broad customer base comprising more than 600 airlines, 4,000 corporate and utility aircraft and helicopter operators, 160 armed forces, more than 2,000 marine customers, including 70 navies, and energy customers in nearly 120 countries. It employs around 39,000 people worldwide people in offices, manufacturing and service facilities in 50 countries and has businesses headquartered in the UK, US, Canada, Germany, Scandinavia and China. This global presence allows the Group to access long-term international growth opportunities with its technology, presence, partnerships and people.
  6. In 2009, Rolls-Royce invested over £864 million on research and development, two thirds of which had the objective of further improving the environmental aspects of its products, in particular the reduction of emissions.
  7. The national network of Science Learning Centres delivers inspirational and innovative subject-specific continuing professional development to teachers, lecturers, technicians and teaching assistants throughout the United Kingdom.
  8. The National Science Learning Centre provides inspirational and innovative professional development for science teachers, technicians, lecturers and teaching assistants from across the UK. Funded by the Wellcome Trust, the £11 million purpose built Centre, situated at the University of York, features the highest specification teaching laboratories, a Resource Centre which carries the country’s largest collection of science teaching and learning resources, multiple teaching rooms and a 300 seat auditorium.
  9. 2008 saw the launch of Project ENTHUSE, a new £30 million partnership between the private, public and charitable sectors providing generous bursaries for teachers to attend courses at the National Science Learning Centre. The Enthuse Awards pay for course fees, accommodation, travel, supply cover, and provide the teachers with money to spend in school on the implementation of their action plans, created whilst they are at the Centre. This has extended the centre’s reach allowing all teachers and lecturers access to affordable, subject-specific CPD.

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